Photographing Models

Well, that has probably got your attention but that’s not the sort of model I am going to go on about here today.

I have had an interest in photography for years and have done the same as many, nicked my Dads camera, got my own Practica then Zenit E (that might have been the other way round), the a pair of Yashicas and finally a Canon. All these were film cameras and I did photos of model and real railways. Never really did people or the really small stuff. I did a bit at school and I did an evening class which worked its way up from the bowl of fruit to, for the final lesson, a real live model.

I sort of lost interest in the proper photography and my proper cameras as the cheapo digital age dawned. At that time `cheap’ DSLR’s were several thousand pounds and I said I wouldn’t get one until they became affordable. Then compact, bridge and mobile phone cameras all got pretty amazing and the photography I was doing then was basically snaps documenting what I and the volunteer groups I was involved with were up to, often just for websites so portability was more important that how clever it was. Cost also proved to be important when I dropped a camera whilst stood on top of a loco which happened to be stood on an inspection pit. I was going to say, “it didn’t bounce” but it did, on pretty much everything it could find on its way down. It didn’t work at the end of it.

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Coaching

A month, or so, ago I was going on about sticks with glimpses of a carriage on my Facebook page but at that time I couldn’t say a lot more. Well I suppose now all can be revealed.

It was a retirement gift for a friend and colleague and is a model loosely based on coach 106. For that reason I couldn’t say a lot until after the presentation. The retiree is Jed Perks who retires from the FR as the carriage maintenance electrician. This all gets a bit scary as I remember when he first volunteered at Boston Lodge. Jed took over maintaining the carriage electrics that I designed and installed after I moved back to working on bigger trains.

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